eject reject witcho ratchet ass

Discovering Yaoi

(Source: r0llcake, via menthuthuyoupi)

unsuccessfulmetalbenders:

you know you’ve been watching too much anime lately when you have to stop your geek ass from putting your hands behind your head and your elbows in the air when you’re out in public

mrgolightly:

This is it, y’all. I am ascending. I’m leaving my body and floating into the heavens. Tell my family I love them and to DVR the new season of American Horror Story for me.

mrgolightly:

This is it, y’all. I am ascending. I’m leaving my body and floating into the heavens. Tell my family I love them and to DVR the new season of American Horror Story for me.

(via 40514294s)

pucci2002:

oluchi @ gucci ss 2000

(via menthuthuyoupi)

america-wakiewakie:

Legal weed’s race problem: White men get rich, black men stay in prison | Salon
Ever since Colorado and Washington made the unprecedented move to legalize recreational pot last year, excitement and stories of unfettered success have billowed into the air. Colorado’s marijuana tax revenue far exceeded expectations, bringing a whopping $185 million to the state and tourists are lining up to taste the budding culture (pun intended). Several other states are now looking to follow suit and legalize.
But the ramifications of this momentous shift are left unaddressed. When you flick on the TV to a segment about the flowering pot market in Colorado, you’ll find that the faces of the movement are primarily white and male. Meanwhile, many of the more than  210,000 people who were arrested for marijuana possession in Colorado between 1986 and 2010 according to a report from the Marijuana Arrest Research Project, remain behind bars. Thousands of black men and boys still sit in prisons for possession of the very plant that’s making those white guys on TV rich.
“In many ways the imagery doesn’t sit right,” said Michelle Alexander, associate professor of law at Ohio State University and author of  The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness in a  public conversation on March 6 with Asha Bandele of the  Drug Policy Alliance.  “Here are white men poised to run big marijuana businesses, dreaming of cashing in big—big money, big businesses selling weed—after 40 years of impoverished black kids getting prison time for selling weed, and their families and futures destroyed. Now, white men are planning to get rich doing precisely the same thing?”
Alexander said she is “thrilled” that Colorado and Washington have legalized pot and that Washington D.C. decriminalized possession of small amounts earlier this month. But she said she’s noticed “warning signs” of a troubling trend emerging in the pot legalization movement: Whites—men in particular—are the face of the movement, and the emerging pot industry. (A recent In These Times article titled “ The Unbearable Whiteness of Marijuana Legalization,” summarize this trend.)
Alexander said for 40 years poor communities of color have experienced the wrath of the war on drugs.
“Black men and boys” have been the target of the war on drugs’ racist policies—stopped, frisked and disturbed—“often before they’re old enough to vote,” she said. Those youths are arrested most often for nonviolent first offenses that would go ignored in middle-class white neighborhoods.
“We arrest these kids at young ages, saddle them with criminal records, throw them in cages, and then release them into a parallel social universe in which the very civil and human rights supposedly won in the Civil Rights movement no longer apply to them for the rest of their lives,” she said. “They can be discriminated against [when it comes to] employment, housing, access to education, public benefits. They’re locked into a permanent second-class status for life. And we’ve done this in precisely the communities that were most in need of our support.”
As Asha Bandele of DPA pointed out during the conversation, the U.S. has 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. Today, 2.2 million people are in prison or jail and 7.7 million are under the control of the criminal justice system, with African American boys and men—and now women—making up a disproportionate number of those imprisoned.
(Read Full Text)

america-wakiewakie:

Legal weed’s race problem: White men get rich, black men stay in prison | Salon

Ever since Colorado and Washington made the unprecedented move to legalize recreational pot last year, excitement and stories of unfettered success have billowed into the air. Colorado’s marijuana tax revenue far exceeded expectations, bringing a whopping $185 million to the state and tourists are lining up to taste the budding culture (pun intended). Several other states are now looking to follow suit and legalize.

But the ramifications of this momentous shift are left unaddressed. When you flick on the TV to a segment about the flowering pot market in Colorado, you’ll find that the faces of the movement are primarily white and male. Meanwhile, many of the more than  210,000 people who were arrested for marijuana possession in Colorado between 1986 and 2010 according to a report from the Marijuana Arrest Research Project, remain behind bars. Thousands of black men and boys still sit in prisons for possession of the very plant that’s making those white guys on TV rich.

“In many ways the imagery doesn’t sit right,” said Michelle Alexander, associate professor of law at Ohio State University and author of  The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness in a  public conversation on March 6 with Asha Bandele of the  Drug Policy Alliance.  “Here are white men poised to run big marijuana businesses, dreaming of cashing in big—big money, big businesses selling weed—after 40 years of impoverished black kids getting prison time for selling weed, and their families and futures destroyed. Now, white men are planning to get rich doing precisely the same thing?”

Alexander said she is “thrilled” that Colorado and Washington have legalized pot and that Washington D.C. decriminalized possession of small amounts earlier this month. But she said she’s noticed “warning signs” of a troubling trend emerging in the pot legalization movement: Whites—men in particular—are the face of the movement, and the emerging pot industry. (A recent In These Times article titled “ The Unbearable Whiteness of Marijuana Legalization,” summarize this trend.)

Alexander said for 40 years poor communities of color have experienced the wrath of the war on drugs.

“Black men and boys” have been the target of the war on drugs’ racist policies—stopped, frisked and disturbed—“often before they’re old enough to vote,” she said. Those youths are arrested most often for nonviolent first offenses that would go ignored in middle-class white neighborhoods.

“We arrest these kids at young ages, saddle them with criminal records, throw them in cages, and then release them into a parallel social universe in which the very civil and human rights supposedly won in the Civil Rights movement no longer apply to them for the rest of their lives,” she said. “They can be discriminated against [when it comes to] employment, housing, access to education, public benefits. They’re locked into a permanent second-class status for life. And we’ve done this in precisely the communities that were most in need of our support.”

As Asha Bandele of DPA pointed out during the conversation, the U.S. has 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. Today, 2.2 million people are in prison or jail and 7.7 million are under the control of the criminal justice system, with African American boys and men—and now women—making up a disproportionate number of those imprisoned.

(Read Full Text)

(via dion-thesocialist)

wheres-the-phone:

nigecha:

http://neweva.blog103.fc2.com/blog-entry-3152.html

image

who is that mystery lady!!!!!

Some clearer pics from twitter:

image

image

[x x]

Who could she be?

(via nigecha)

(Source: silvermoon424, via axeystuff)

(Source: thewhitemoonfamily, via theenvydilemma)

aphcutie:


ADAMS by: かぎお

aphcutie:

ADAMS by: かぎお

(via fiendswithbenefits)

Anonymous: if people in france and germany wanted to BDS america, how would you feel?

maarnayeri:

This question is so odd to me. What’s the ultimate answer you seek with a query like this.

Are you asking if I want to see the brutality against and exploitation of NDN communities cease by any means necessary? Absolutely. Do I want to be alive for the day America falls apart as an inherently antiblack imperial structure built off the trafficking, brutal displacement and genocide of millions of Africans and sustained by stripping third world nations of resources, human labor and promoting global destabilization? Without a doubt. Is that a future I am willing to work towards? Completely.

I suppose my issue is it wouldn’t necessarily be up to France and Germany to choose that for any oppressed community in America or by America.

I don’t think people seem to realize that BDS isn’t an American thing. This isn’t a reactionary thing started by Americans to oppress the ~~poor Israelis. This is a movement that was started by Palestinians. Palestinians at Tel Aviv University grouped together and carefully devised a set of regulations that serve to cease the profiting off their suffering and displacement. To put pressure on Israeli politicians, as well as various internationally based corporations that calluously oppress Palestinians. Palestinians are requesting we honor those rules and that’s what we are attempting to get our universities and workplaces to do.

If there was a similar movement initiated by Indigneous communities in America to address and take to task the fundamental policies of this nation that have oppressed them since time immemorial, I would support that in every measure and request everyone do the same.

I realize my position of a settler in America, but given America’s exportation of violence abroad, I doubly serve as a recepient of American brutality and I feel that oppression against all people of color and imperialized/colonized peoples in America is intrinsically linked, so I view the liberation of my people as incomplete without the liberation of Indigenous and Black American here.

So in short, if people in France and Germany wanted to BDS America with the intention of respecting the request of Indigneous communities (or any oppressed community, for that matter) in America, I would be supportive of it.

maarnayeri:

A few days ago, I talked to my grandmother in Eritrea about working in the food service industry. Most of the conversation was me trying to rationalize the depraved mechanisms of capitalistic voyeurism in the US, though there really isn’t such a thing.

When she realized that much of the food gets thrown out at the end of the night, she asked why when there are so many people going hungry. I told her a lot of it had to do with discouraging the employees from taking food. “What’s wrong with taking food? Especially if its already been bought and winds up in the trash anyways? These employees have families, don’t they? They could use the food.” she replied. And honestly, how do you respond to surplus of food being tossed as waste to a woman’s whose witnessed people die from famines?

There wasn’t anything I could say to justify it. There was a long silence between us and I said I don’t know, it doesn’t make sense. We ended the conversation with her stating “adikhi com himamey eyu dizekireni, si’ilu yiserikh bizey mikhiyat, bizey misikar, nabra yebulun” which roughly translates to “your country reminds me of my last episode of cancer, causing theft and dispair simply because it can, its entire life dependant on the suffering of others” and that’s probably the most honest way I’ve heard someone refer to the way American capitalistic economics function.

(via maarnayeri)

tsunamiwavesurfing:

when patamon digivolved to angemon for the first time that shit was raw as hell my nigga lemme tell you

cynnchestra:

when a character from a show you like doesn’t have any art

image

(via axeystuff)

(Source: lilbeca, via nefertiti)

a-state-of-bliss:

Versace 1995 - Amber Valletta & Shalom Harlow by Richard Avedon

a-state-of-bliss:

Versace 1995 - Amber Valletta & Shalom Harlow by Richard Avedon

(via menthuthuyoupi)

theme